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Book Review: Searchlights and Sunglasses: Field Notes from the Digital Age of Journalism

Searchlights and Sunglasses: Field Notes from the Digital Age of Journalism
By Eric Newton
Knight Foundation & Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute, 2013

Journalism is experiencing an era of significant upheaval. Long-established business models that relied too heavily on advertising revenues are breaking down; journalism organizations are cutting resources and employees; and audiences have developed different habits and expectations when searching for information. The digital age has presented journalism with an array of significant challenges, but it also has brought great opportunities, and it is crucial to recognize them.

That is the overarching theme of Searchlights and Sunglasses: Field Notes from the Digital Age of Journalism by Eric Newton.

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Book Review: Ed Kennedy’s War: V-E Day, Censorship, & the Associated Press

Ed Kennedy’s War: V-E Day, Censorship, & the Associated Press
By Ed Kennedy, with an introduction by Tom Curley and John Maxwell Hamilton
Edited by Julia Kennedy Cochran
Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge, 2012
248 Pages

Journalism and mass communication students in America today have lived continuously in a country at war – a War on Terror, a war in Afghanistan, and a war in Iraq – but most do not truly understand the cost of those struggles. Neither do their parents. Americans are not fully engaged with these wars, in part because of the absence of daily, widespread reporting about them. Many journalists have bravely reported from these war zones, but the saturation coverage of previous wars, such as Vietnam and World War II, has not been sustained, even though the casualties continue. Albeit these are very different wars, but journalists have no greater obligation than to keep a free and open society informed about the military actions of their government.

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Book Review: Watergate’s Legacy and the Press: The Investigative Impulse

Watergate’s Legacy and the Press: The Investigative Impulse
By Jon Marshall
Medill School of Journalism/Northwestern University Press
Evanston, Illinois, 2011
313 Pages

The word, “Watergate,” suggests a high point in American investigative journalism. Although investigative journalism may not seem as influential today as during the Watergate era, the craft will continue to have an impact on American democracy, according to Jon Marshall, who traces the past and future of investigative reporting in Watergate’s Legacy and the Press: The Investigative Impulse.

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