Category Archives: Volume One

First Issue of The Journal of Public Relations Education

Journal of Public Relations Education

Volume 1, Issue 1, August 2015

Table of Contents

Research Articles

Can every class be a Twitter chat?: Cross-institutional collaboration and experiential learning in the social media classroom

Julia Daisy Fraustino, West Virginia University
Rowena Briones, Virginia Commonwealth University
Melissa Jansoke, University of Memphis

In their own words: A thematic analysis of students’ comments about their writing skills in mass communication programs

Scott Kuehn, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
Andrew Lingwall, Clarion University of Pennsylvania

Teaching Briefs

Integrating leadership in public relations education to
develop future leaders
 

Juan Meng , University of Georgia

A publication of the Public Relations Division of AEJMC
© Copyright 2015 AEJMC Public Relations Division

The Journal of Public Relations Education (JPRE) is devoted to the presentation of research and commentary that advances the field of public relations education. JPRE invites submissions in the following three categories.

  • Research Articles
  • Teaching Briefs
  • Book/Software Reviews

Learn more by visiting the About JPRE page and the Authors / Contributors page for submission guidelines. All submissions should follow the guidelines of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).

Questions?  Meet the Editorial Staff. Ask the editor, Chuck Lubbers.

Journal of Public Relations Education: All Articles |  Download the full PDF (Slideshare)

Journal of Public Relations Education

Volume 1, Issue 1, August 2015

A publication of the Public Relations Division of AEJMC
Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication

Volume 1, Issue 1, August 2015
A publication of the Public Relations Division of AEJMC
© Copyright 2015 AEJMC Public Relations Division

Can every class be a Twitter chat? Cross-institutional collaboration and experiential learning in the social media classroom, Journal of Public Relations Education

Authors

  • Julia Daisy Fraustino (left), West Virginia University
  • Rowena Briones (center), Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Melissa Janoske (right), University of Memphis

fraustina   rowena-briones   janoske

Abstract

Using the framework of experiential learning theory to guide assignment creation, instructors of social media strategy classes at three university campuses conducted cross-institutional Twitter chats with students. By creating topical case studies using the online storytelling platform Storify and discussing them during the chats, students applied course theories and concepts, built professional networks, honed professional skills, and broadened understanding of strategic communication using new tools in unique digital cultures. Qualitative textual analysis of the 2,088 tweets coupled with instructors’ teaching observations revealed the assignments fostered conditions for an experiential learning process, which students enjoyed. Best practices for teaching using similar assignments in public relations and social media are offered.

Fraustino, J. D., Briones, R., & Janoske, M. (2015). Can every class be a Twitter chat?: Cross-institutional collaboration and experiential learning in the social media classroom, Journal of Public Relations Education, 1(1), 1-18.

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In their own words: A thematic analysis of students’ comments about their writing skills in mass communication programs


Authors

  • Scott Kuehn (left), Clarion University of Pennsylvania
  • Andrew Lingwall (right), Clarion University of Pennsylvania

skuehn    lingwall

Abstract

This study explored student self-perceptions of writing skills in mass communication programs at 13 public state universities in the Mid-Atlantic region. Responses to three open-ended questions revealed heavy student concern with their basic skills, a desire for extensive faculty contact and feedback, and for many respondents, an immaturity or naiveté regarding professional standards. This study addresses implications for faculty members who wish to better understand their students in order to devise more effective writing instruction.

Kuehn, S., & Lingwall, A. (2015). In their own words: A thematic analysis of students’ comments about their writing skills in mass communication programs, Journal of Public Relations Education, 1 (1), 19-30.

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