CT&M Spring 2016 Newsletter

The spring 2016 edition of CT&M CONCEPTS is available now!

Check it out for these featured items and more:

  • Advice for scholars from Jack McLeod
  • The CT&M program for the AEJMC conference in Minneapolis this fall
  • A call for papers for AEJMC 2016
  • A call for Barrow Minority Scholarship applications
  • A note from the 2015 winner of the Barrow Minority Scholarship

You can download the newsletter here.

CT&M Summer 2015 Newsletter

Just in time for the AEJMC 2015 conference, our CT&M Summer 2015 Newsletter is here.

Some highlights:

  • Celebrate CT&M’s 50th anniversary with us! Join us at the best-of-CT&M session from 5:15 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 8. CT&M Lifetime Achievement award winner Jack McLeod will serve as discussant.
  • Jörg Matthes will serve as the next editor-in-chief of CMM. He is the current research chair of CT&M and current associate editor of CMM.
  • We are still waiting to hear the results of our bid for ISI listing. Please visit our business meeting (Sat. Aug. 8 @ 7 p.m.), immediately after the best-of-CT&M session, for the most recent news.
  • Our paper submissions increased from 79 papers in 2014 to 99 papers in 2015. There was a 50% acceptance rate in 2015, compared to 57% in 2014.
  • We will distribute awards for the top papers and Barrow Minority Scholarship award at the business meeting. Congrats to all of the winners!
  • There are two PF&R panels:
    1. The first panel, “Exploring Collaborative
      Opportunities for Accessing Data,” will
      explore methods for accessing data for political
      and public opinion research.
    2. The second panel, “The Unbearable Filteredness
      of Being Online: Customization and the Media
      We Consume,” will explore ethical, business, and
      research implications related to the customization
      of content enabled by machine-based customization,
      filtering, message tailoring, network
      structure, etc.
  • There are two teaching panels:
    1. Academia 2.0, when professors become public
      intellectuals: benefits and detriments
    2. Theories Redux: Which defy time? How do others
      hold in the face of new communication contexts?
  • Download the newsletter for a complete listing of award winners and the CT&M session schedule for the conference.

CMM Special Call: Communication Exposure in a Changing Environment

Communication Exposure in a Changing Environment

Call for papers for special issue of Communication Methods and Measures
Edited by Claes de Vreese & Peter Neijens
The Amsterdam School of Communication Research ASCoR
University of Amsterdam

The measurement of how people are ‘exposed’ to media content, which is crucial for the understanding of media use and media effects, has been a challenge for a long time. On the one hand, today’s media landscape in which individuals are exposed to messages anytime, anywhere from a great variety of sources on an increasing number of different platforms has complicated the measurement of media exposure even more. On the other hand, the new digital media offer also new possibilities to map media exposure by means of passive measurement.

CMM_image

Our current thinking about exposure stems from a time with clearly demarcated media types, platforms, and limited choice. We propose that it is valuable to consider the term communication exposure as a heuristic for understanding, at a broader level, that exposure can entail exposure to different media, on different platforms, with different contents, in different combinations. As many of the distinctions between media blur, the concept of communication exposure may offer a more encompassing and comprehensive framework. This will have serious implications for our measurement of exposure.

In this special issue we invite submissions that deal with the conceptualization and measurement of exposure. These can be both theoretical and empirical in nature.

In the opening article, we identify recent developments in the way in which communication exposure is measured and we evaluate their strengths and weaknesses. We provide an overview of the development in published research in the major journals in the past decade drawing on media exposure measures. We also introduce a research tool for media exposure measurement and conclude with a research agenda for issues that need to be tackled in future research.

Submissions should follow CM&M submission guidelines, including the use of APA format, and should be submitted through the submission portal at

http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/cmm

All manuscripts will undergo initial review by the editors and subsequent peer review. Manuscripts are due by June 1, 2015. In the cover letter, please indicate that you are submitting for consideration in the special issue on exposure.

 

Spring 2014 Newsletter

Our Spring 2014 Newsletter is ready. Here are some highlights: Download it here!

  • Call for Papers for Montreal 2014
  • CT&M Programming for 2014 — Including the Pre-conference, Members’ Meeting, Teaching Sessions, and PF&R Session
  • Pre-conference Summary — It’s About Big Data and How to Transform it to Structured, Usable Formats
  • An Interesting, Brief Story of CT&M Origins
  • Call for Barrow Minority Scholarship Applications
  • CMM Special Issue Paper Call — “Questionable Research and Publication Practices in Communication Science”

CMM Special Issue on “Questionable Research and Publication Practices in Communication Science”

CMM Special Issue on “Questionable Research and Publication Practices in Communication Science”

Across the globe, scientific research communities are engaged in heated debates about scientific conduct and questionable research and publication practices (often referred to as the “sloppy science” debate). This debate centers on the prevalence of questionable scientific practices and on the extent to which such practices hinder scientific progress.

Although the debate originated in other research fields, it clearly is relevant to the practice of communication science. This special issue of Communication Method & Measures aims to spark a discussion about “sloppy science” in communication research – a critical reflection on our common research and reporting practices – with the goal of potentially improving our standards heading into the future.

Download the full paper call here for more details about the special issue.